Goldthorpe, Charlotte (2016) Creating artefacts from memories of lost love. In: Love Letters - Inter-disciplinary.net, 2nd - 4th July 2016, Mansfield College, Oxford University. (Unpublished)
Abstract

I am a contemporary visual arts practitioner collecting letters of lost love memories and utilising emotional objects to create a series of artefacts that embody past relationships. These artefacts act as a shrine or reliquary symbolising the feelings of the lost love.

Hosting ‘Lost Love Cafes’ and creating ‘Love Donation Boxes’ has allowed individuals to contribute their stories through written letter or oral interview.
Investigating into three types of love, familial, platonic and romantic, in conjunction with loss has allowed stories of partners, friendships, parents and relatives to be submitted. Analysis of the letters is on going, focusing on key moments, objects and feelings that inform design experimentation. These will form the basis for 9 artefacts, 3 of each love type.
Each artefact will differ dependant on type of connection and time or emotion invested within different relationships.

The N-Exlace has been created as an experimental piece based around a personal lost love. Using diary entries, photographs and love letters allowed me to re-connect with the emotions of the relationship, working with key events, objects and literature allowed the analysis to direct the design of the neckpiece.
Working in translucent silicone allows impressions of objects to be captured leaving a ghostly trace like old memories and natural leather ages becoming imprinted like our own skin.

I would like to propose an interactive talk, with elements of an installation and lost love story collection workshop, discussing previous work and process as to how letters of lost love are used to create emotional artefact. Concluding with a lost love writing session posing a series of thought provoking questions to encourage thought on familial, friendship or romantic lost love.
These can be submitted to the Lost Love project if desired.

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