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Storytelling and role play to increase younger children’s autonomy within research. What younger children really think and understand about online safety

Watson, Lindsey (2017) Storytelling and role play to increase younger children’s autonomy within research. What younger children really think and understand about online safety. In: TACTYC Annual Conference, 04/11/2017, ICC Birmingham. (Unpublished)

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Abstract

TACTYC Conference abstract 2017

Storytelling and role play to increase younger children’s autonomy within research. What younger children really think and understand about online safety.

This early career research paper is situated within a wider study investigating younger children’s understanding of online safety and how increasing children’s autonomy and voice can be included to potentially help with supporting younger children’s online safety. The paper begins with an overview of the literature, recognising the research paucity around younger children’s understanding of online safety (Holloway, Green and Livingstone, 2013). The paper then discusses children’s role within research and how participatory methods can potentially increase children’s voices; becoming active participants who can add to the body of knowledge about various issues in their lives (Einarsdottir & Harcourt 2011; Lansdown 2005; Pinter, Kuchah & Smith, 2013). To ensure children’s autonomy, this paper proposes two creative methodological approaches, storytelling and role play, to encourage research with children as opposed to research on children. Age appropriate story books with a focus on digital technology, will be examined to determine how issues of digital engagement, online safety, risk, trust and danger could be explored. Next, the paper discusses role-play, encouraging a holistic and child-centred approach to data collection and how this can facilitate further interpretation and depth. This paper thus seeks to explore issues around increasing younger children’s role within research, making a cultural shift from children viewed as passive to competent research participants.

Einarsdottir, J., & D. Harcourt. (2011). “Introducing Children’s Perspectives and Participation in Research.” European Early Childhood Education Journal 19(3), 301–307.

Holloway, D., Green, L., & Livingstone, S. (2013). Zero to Eight, Young Children and their Internet Use. London: London School of Economics and Political Science & EU Kids Online.

Lansdown, G. (2005). ‘Can you hear me? The right of young children to participate in decisions affecting them’, Working Paper 36. The Hague: Bernard van Leer Foundation.

Pinter, A., Kuchah, K., & Smith, R. (2013). Researching with Children. ELT Journal, 67(4), 484-487.

Item Type: Conference or Workshop Item (Paper)
Subjects: H Social Sciences > H Social Sciences (General)
L Education > L Education (General)
Schools: School of Education and Professional Development
Related URLs:
Depositing User: Lindsey Watson
Date Deposited: 05 Dec 2017 14:33
Last Modified: 05 Dec 2017 14:33
URI: http://eprints.hud.ac.uk/id/eprint/33860

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