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Review: What is literature, by Arthur Gibson

Malay, Jessica L. (2008) Review: What is literature, by Arthur Gibson. Philosophy in Review, 28 (5). pp. 331-333. ISSN 1206-5269

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      Abstract

      Gibson’s exploration of literature in this ambitious work positions itself as a response to Jean-Paul Sartre’s series of essays published as What is Literature? in 1947. Gibson claims that the nature of literature is not, as Sartre asserts, ‘finite and particular’ but rather a ‘series of infinite qualities’ (479). He explains that literature opens up meaning continually and in surprising ways. The concept of surprise is fundamental to Gibson’s contention that literature is ‘counter-intuitive’. Thus the main thesis of the book is contained in Gibson’s assertion that ‘great literature directs attention to new ways of seeing’ (19). This statement could be just as usefully applied to Gibson’s own book. In it he proposes a myriad of positions from which to consider the infinite and surprising nature of literature.

      Item Type: Article
      Additional Information: Reproduced by kind permission of Philosophy in Review
      Subjects: B Philosophy. Psychology. Religion > B Philosophy (General)
      P Language and Literature > PN Literature (General)
      Schools: School of Music, Humanities and Media
      Related URLs:
      Depositing User: Sara Taylor
      Date Deposited: 06 Aug 2009 11:48
      Last Modified: 28 Jul 2010 19:45
      URI: http://eprints.hud.ac.uk/id/eprint/5351

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