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The Missing Link in Training to Detect Deception and its Implications for Justice

Ryan, Saskia, Sherretts, Nicole, Willmott, Dominic, Mojtahedi, Dara and Baughman, Benjamin (2017) The Missing Link in Training to Detect Deception and its Implications for Justice. Safer Communities. ISSN 1757-8043 (In Press)

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Abstract

Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to investigate the effect of response bias and target gender on detecting dection.
Design/ methodology - Participants were randomly assigned to one of three experimental conditions: a stereotype condition (bogus training group), a tell-signs condition (empirically tested cues), and a control condition. Participants were required to decide whether eight targets were lying or telling the truth, based upon the information they had been given. Accuracy was measured via a correct or incorrect response to the stimuli. The data was then analyzed using a 2x2x3 mixed Analysis of Variance (ANOVA) to determine whether any main or interactional effects were present.
Results - Results revealed training condition had no significant effect on accuracy, nor was there a within-subjects effect of gender. However, there was a significant main effect of accuracy in detecting truth or lies and a significant interaction between target gender and detecting truth or lies.
Research limitations – Further research should seek a larger sample of participants with a more extensive training aspect as the brief training offered here may not reflect that which could be offered to professionals.
Practical Implications - Within the criminal justice system, the need for increased accuracy in detecting deception is of critical importance; not only to detect whether a guilty individual is being deceitful, but also whether someone is making a false confession, not only to improve community safety by detaining the correct perpetrator for the crime but also to maintain public trust in the justice system.

Item Type: Article
Subjects: B Philosophy. Psychology. Religion > BF Psychology
Schools: School of Human and Health Sciences
Related URLs:
Depositing User: Dara Mojtahedi
Date Deposited: 07 Sep 2017 12:57
Last Modified: 29 Nov 2017 12:07
URI: http://eprints.hud.ac.uk/id/eprint/32964

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