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Visual feedback attenuates mean concentric barbell velocity loss, and improves motivation, competitiveness, and perceived workload in male adolescent athletes

Weakley, Jonathon J. S., Wilson, Kyle M., Till, Kevin, Read, Dale B., Darrall-Jones, Joshua, Roe, Gregory A. B., Phibbs, Padraic J. and Jones, Ben (2017) Visual feedback attenuates mean concentric barbell velocity loss, and improves motivation, competitiveness, and perceived workload in male adolescent athletes. Journal of Strength and Conditioning Research. ISSN 1064-8011

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Abstract

It is unknown whether instantaneous visual feedback of resistance training outcomes can enhance barbell velocity in younger athletes. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to quantify the effects of visual feedback on mean concentric barbell velocity in the back squat, and to identify changes in motivation, competitiveness, and perceived workload. In a randomised-crossover design (Feedback vs. Control) feedback of mean concentric barbell velocity was or was not provided throughout a set of 10 repetitions in the barbell back squat. Magnitude-based inferences were used to assess changes between conditions, with almost certainly greater differences in mean concentric velocity between the Feedback (0.70 +/-0.04 m[middle dot]s-1) and Control (0.65 +/-0.05 m[middle dot]s-1) observed. Additionally, individual repetition mean concentric velocity ranged from possibly (repetition number two: 0.79 +/-0.04 vs. 0.78 +/-0.04 m[middle dot]s-1) to almost certainly (repetition number 10: 0.58 +/-0.05 vs. 0.49 +/-0.05 m[middle dot]s-1) greater when provided feedback, while almost certain differences were observed in motivation, competitiveness, and perceived workload, respectively. Providing adolescent male athletes with visual kinematic information while completing resistance training is beneficial for the maintenance of barbell velocity during a training set, potentially enhancing physical performance. Moreover, these improvements were observed alongside increases in motivation, competitiveness and perceived workload providing insight into the underlying mechanisms responsible for the performance gains observed. Given the observed maintenance of barbell velocity during a training set, practitioners can use this technique to manipulate training outcomes during resistance training.

Item Type: Article
Uncontrolled Keywords: Kinematic feedback, back squat, resistance training
Subjects: Q Science > QP Physiology
R Medicine > RC Internal medicine > RC1200 Sports Medicine
Schools: School of Human and Health Sciences
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Depositing User: Sally Hughes
Date Deposited: 28 Jul 2017 15:38
Last Modified: 29 Jul 2017 08:15
URI: http://eprints.hud.ac.uk/id/eprint/32523

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