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How durable is the effect of low intensity CBT for depression and anxiety? Remission and relapse in a longitudinal cohort study

Ali, Shehzad, Rhodes, Laura, Moreea, Omar, McMillan, Dean, Gilbody, Simon, Leach, Chris, Lucock, Mike, Lutz, Wolfgang and Delgadillo, Jaime (2017) How durable is the effect of low intensity CBT for depression and anxiety? Remission and relapse in a longitudinal cohort study. Behaviour Research and Therapy, 94. pp. 1-8. ISSN 0005-7967

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Abstract

Background

Depression and anxiety disorders are relapse-prone conditions, even after successful treatment with pharmacotherapy or psychotherapy. Cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT) is known to prevent relapse, but there is little evidence of the durability of remission after low intensity forms of CBT (LiCBT).

Method

This study aimed to examine relapse rates 12 months after completing routinely-delivered LiCBT. A cohort of 439 LiCBT completers with remission of symptoms provided monthly depression (PHQ-9) and anxiety (GAD-7) measures during 12 months after treatment. Survival analysis was conducted to model time-to-relapse while controlling for patient characteristics.

Results

Overall, 53% of cases relapsed within 1 year. Of these relapse events, the majority (79%) occurred within the first 6 months post-treatment. Cases reporting residual depression symptoms (PHQ-9 = 5 to 9) at the end of treatment had significantly higher risk of relapse (hazard ratio = 1.90, p < 0.001).

Conclusions

The high rate of relapse after LiCBT highlights the need for relapse prevention, particularly for those with residual depression symptoms.

Item Type: Article
Uncontrolled Keywords: Depression; Anxiety; Relapse; Cognitive behavioural therapy
Subjects: R Medicine > R Medicine (General)
R Medicine > RA Public aspects of medicine
Schools: School of Human and Health Sciences
Related URLs:
Depositing User: Sally Hughes
Date Deposited: 05 May 2017 13:27
Last Modified: 05 May 2017 18:30
URI: http://eprints.hud.ac.uk/id/eprint/31856

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