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The effect on ambulatory blood pressure of working under favourably and unfavourably perceived supervisors

Wager, Nadia, Fieldman, G. and Hussey, T. (2003) The effect on ambulatory blood pressure of working under favourably and unfavourably perceived supervisors. Occupational and environmental medicine, 60 (7). pp. 468-474. ISSN 1351-0711

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Abstract

Aims: To investigate the role played by employees’ perceptions of their supervisors’ interactional styles as a possible source of workplace stress that may be associated with increased morbidity and mortality rates from cardiovascular disorders in workers in the lower strata of organisational hierarchies. Methods: A controlled, quasi-experimental, field study of female healthcare assistants. Allocation to the experimental and control groups was based on participants’ responses to a supervisor interactional style questionnaire. Experimental participants (n = 13) reported working under two divergently perceived supervisors at the same workplace, on different days. The control group (n = 15) worked either under one supervisor, or two similarly perceived supervisors. Ambulatory blood pressure was recorded every 30 minutes, over a 12 hour period for three days. Results: The control group showed a 3 mm Hgdifference in systolic blood pressure (SBP) and a nonsignificant difference in diastolic blood pressure (DBP; mean difference 1 mm Hg) between the two supervisor conditions. The experimental group showed significantly higher SBP (15 mm Hg) and DBP (7 mm Hg) when working under a less favoured compared to a favoured supervisor. The degree of divergence in perceptions of supervisors shows a significant positive relation with the difference in blood pressure between the two workdays. Divergence in perceptions of interpersonal fairness is the strongest predictor of difference in blood pressure. Conclusion: An unfavourably perceived supervisor is a potent workplace stressor, which might have a clinically significant impact on supervisees’ cardiovascular functioning.

Item Type: Article
Contributors:
ContributionNameEmailORCID
AuthorFieldman, GeorgeUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
UNSPECIFIEDHussey, TrevorUNSPECIFIEDUNSPECIFIED
Subjects: B Philosophy. Psychology. Religion > BF Psychology
R Medicine > RA Public aspects of medicine > RA0421 Public health. Hygiene. Preventive Medicine
Schools: School of Human and Health Sciences > Centre for Applied Childhood, Youth and Family Research
School of Human and Health Sciences
Related URLs:
Depositing User: Nadia Wager
Date Deposited: 10 Jan 2017 12:59
Last Modified: 10 Jan 2017 12:59
URI: http://eprints.hud.ac.uk/id/eprint/30857

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