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The Health Impact Assessment of the Home Office Reducing Burglary Initiative

Hirschfield, Alex, Boardman, Sally, Douglass, John and Strobl, Judith (2001) The Health Impact Assessment of the Home Office Reducing Burglary Initiative. Project Report. UPERRL, Liverpool. (Unpublished)

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        Abstract

        1.1 There is an increasing body of literature, which considers not only the
        negative health impacts of crime on individuals and communities, but also the nature
        and context of fear of crime. This element, which is not easily explained by either
        experience or risk of crime, has only recently been further explored. The health
        impacts of property crimes such as theft and burglary are, however, the least well
        documented of all crime types. Researchers have even less frequently examined the
        preventive and protective effects on health of crime prevention; this is probably the
        first study approaching this subject directly for the area of domestic burglary.
        1.2 Emerging Health Impact Assessment (HIA) methods offer mechanisms for
        identifying and exploring the potential links between health and non-health policies,
        programmes or projects (Lock, 2000). The current rapid HIA study has applied an
        ‘off-the-shelf’ method for HIA, the Merseyside Guidelines (Scott-Samuel et al., 1998)
        to the Home Office’s national Reducing Burglary Initiative (RBI), both prospectively
        and retrospectively in selected local case study projects

        Item Type: Monograph (Project Report)
        Subjects: H Social Sciences > H Social Sciences (General)
        H Social Sciences > HN Social history and conditions. Social problems. Social reform
        Schools: School of Human and Health Sciences
        School of Human and Health Sciences > Centre for Applied Childhood Studies
        Related URLs:
        Depositing User: Sara Taylor
        Date Deposited: 10 Mar 2011 14:31
        Last Modified: 10 Mar 2011 14:31
        URI: http://eprints.hud.ac.uk/id/eprint/9716

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