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CFD Investigation on 3-Dimensional Interference of a Five-Hole Probe in an Automotive Wheel Arch

Malviya, Vihar, Mishra, Rakesh and Palmer, Edward (2010) CFD Investigation on 3-Dimensional Interference of a Five-Hole Probe in an Automotive Wheel Arch. Advances in Mechanical Engineering, 2010. pp. 1-19. ISSN 1687-8132

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    Abstract

    Detailed flowmeasurements are essential for analysing flow structures found in confined spaces, particularly in various automotive
    applications. These measurements will be extremely helpful in solving flow dependent complexities. Although considerable
    progress has been made in computational techniques for investigating such flows, experimental flow measurements are still very
    difficult to carry out therein. Flows mapped using an array of robust instruments like multi-hole pressure probes can provide
    significant insight into the flow field of such complex flows. Pressure probes can withstand the harsh environments found in such
    applications; however being intrusive devices significant interference in flow field can limit their applicability. This paper presents
    an investigation of three-dimensional interference caused by multi-hole pressure probes in an automotive wheel arch. It involves
    simulation of flow around a pressure probe inserted at various locations within the wheel/wheel arch gap. Pressure and velocity
    fields along longitudinal and lateral planes have been mapped and the extent of interference caused by the probe along three
    orthogonal axes has been presented. A three-dimensional ellipsoid of interference has been defined to assist in recommending
    optimal placement of probes and minimise the error due to interprobe interaction, thus enhancing the measurement accuracy of
    transient flow phenomena.

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    Item Type: Article
    Uncontrolled Keywords: automotive aerodynamics, computational fluid dynamics, multi-hole pressure probe, flow interference, wheel arch
    Subjects: T Technology > T Technology (General)
    T Technology > TJ Mechanical engineering and machinery
    T Technology > TL Motor vehicles. Aeronautics. Astronautics
    Schools: School of Computing and Engineering
    School of Computing and Engineering > Automotive Engineering Research Group
    School of Computing and Engineering > Pedagogical Research Group
    School of Computing and Engineering > Diagnostic Engineering Research Centre
    School of Computing and Engineering > Diagnostic Engineering Research Centre > Energy, Emissions and the Environment Research Group
    School of Computing and Engineering > Diagnostic Engineering Research Centre > Machinery Condition and Performance Monitoring Research Group
    School of Computing and Engineering > Diagnostic Engineering Research Centre > Measurement System and Signal Processing Research Group
    School of Computing and Engineering > Informatics Research Group
    School of Computing and Engineering > Informatics Research Group > XML, Database and Information Retrieval Research Group
    School of Computing and Engineering > High Performance Computing Research Group
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    Depositing User: Vihar Malviya
    Date Deposited: 01 Jun 2010 16:40
    Last Modified: 16 Dec 2010 09:56
    URI: http://eprints.hud.ac.uk/id/eprint/7756

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