Search:
Computing and Library Services - delivering an inspiring information environment

Services for young people who sexually abuse

Hackett, Simon, Masson, Helen and Phillips, Sarah (2005) Services for young people who sexually abuse. Project Report. Youth Justice Board for England and Wales, England.

[img] PDF
YJB_publication_-_Mapping_services_-_full_report.pdf - Published Version
Restricted to Repository staff only

Download (630kB)

Abstract

Aim
The overall aim of this study was to investigate recent developments in the UK
and Republic of Ireland in services for young people who have demonstrated
sexually abusive behaviour, including their organisational, theoretical and policy bases,
and to explore the experiences of young people and their families who are receiving
such services.
Rationale
It has been recognised that sexual abuse perpetrated by young people constitutes a
significant proportion of all sexual abuse committed in the UK and Republic of Ireland.
For example, the most recently available criminal statistics indicate that 17% of all
Cautions and convictions for sexual offences in England and Wales in the year 2001
related to young people under the age of 18 (Home Office, 2002).
Nevertheless, services designed to respond to such groups of young people are in their
relative infancy, with previous research highlighting the problematic nature of their
piecemeal development (Masson, 1997 and 1998). There has been little overall sense of
the range of services being offered in the UK to different populations of young people
with sexually abusive behaviour across both the child welfare and Criminal Justice
System. While something of a ‘treatment’ orthodoxy has developed more broadly in the
adult sex offender field (Hackett, 2000), there have been few previous concerted
attempts to understand the development and current ‘landscape’ of services in the
adolescent field. In addition, there has been little, if any, published research into the
experiences and views of young people and their families who receive such services.
There is, therefore, an urgent need for research to fill these gaps in the current
knowledge base.
In order to meet the overall goal set out above, the current study has gathered data on
the nature of service provision, policy and practice relating to young people with
sexually abusive and harmful behaviour across England, Wales, Scotland, Northern
Ireland and the Republic of Ireland. In this way, the current study has sought to form
the most comprehensive review of the field undertaken, to date, in the UK and Republic
of Ireland.
The process
After an initial analysis of the available literature, the following five-stage process was
used to meet the objectives of the study.
First, a survey was undertaken to collect the views and opinions of key experts (n=78)
working in the field on the nature of effective intervention or ‘treatment’ with this group
of young people. Using the Delphi method, it was possible to identify levels of
consensus about the orientation and principles of this work, its core goals, components
and theoretical basis. Second, a further Delphi study, focusing on structural and management issues in this
area of practice, was undertaken with managers of services working with young people
who have sexually abused (n=65).
Third, a comprehensive ‘mapping’ survey relating to services for young people who
have demonstrated sexually abusive behaviour and their families (n=186) was
undertaken, collecting data on the nature of each service, its users, practices, policies
and procedures.
Fourth, an analysis of available policy documents (n=43) on the subject of children
and young people who have sexually abused was undertaken. Local area child
protection committee (ACPC) procedures and guidance documents, children’s services
plans, ACPC annual reports, and youth offending team (YOT) protocols were analysed
as to their usefulness and comprehensiveness in dealing effectively with this issue.
Fifth, a small-scale qualitative study of service-user perspectives (n=23) from a
variety of sites across the UK and Northern Ireland collected users’ views and opinions
about the professional systems which have been involved in their lives in the aftermath
of sexually abusive behaviour.
The findings from each of these five research elements are reported within separate
chapters in this report, together with a fuller description of the methodology used in
each case.
The researchers
The research was conducted by Simon Hackett of the University of Durham and Dr
Helen Masson of the University of Huddersfield over two years ending in October
2003. In order to meet the research objectives, Sarah Phillips was employed as Research
Associate for the project and was based at the University of Durham. Although Simon
was Principal Investigator, all three members of the research team worked closely
together on all aspects of the study, including preparation, the development of research
tools and questionnaires, data analysis and the preparation of reports.
Project Advisory Group
The project team was greatly assisted by the Project Advisory Group, which was made
up of senior representatives from the funding bodies, experts from the field across the
various geographical areas, and independent academic researchers. The Project
Advisory Group met on three occasions, once via a tele-conference. The group advised
on the development of the research tools and methodology, and were given regular
progress reports. Members of the advisory group are listed in Appendix 1.

Item Type: Monograph (Project Report)
Subjects: H Social Sciences > H Social Sciences (General)
H Social Sciences > HN Social history and conditions. Social problems. Social reform
Schools: School of Human and Health Sciences
School of Human and Health Sciences > Centre for Applied Childhood Studies
Related URLs:
References:

Bankes, N. (2002) ‘I Am Sorry I Haven’t a Clue: Unconscious Processes in
Practitioners who Work with Young People who Sexually Abuse’ in Calder, M. Young
People who Sexually Abuse. Building the Evidence Base for your Practice Lyme Regis:
Russell House Publishing
Becker, J. (1998) ‘What We Know About the Characteristics and Treatment of
Adolescents who have Committed Sexual Offenses’. Child Maltreatment, 3 (4) 317–329
Beech, B. (1997) ‘Studying the Future: a Delphi Survey of How Multi-Disciplinary
Clinical Staff View the Likely Development of Two Community Mental Health Centres
over the Course of the Next Two Years’. Journal of Advanced Nursing, 25, 331–338
Beech, B. (1999) ‘Go the Extra Mile – Use the Delphi Technique’ Journal of Nursing
Management, 7, 281–288
Bird Edmunds, S. (ed) (1997) Impact: Working with Sexual Abusers. Brandon, Vermont:
Safer Society Press
Bridge Child Care Development Service (2001) Childhood Lost: Part 8 Case
Review. Bridge Child Care Development Service
Burton D. and Darden-Smith, J. (2000) North American Survey of Sexual Abuser
Treatment and Models: Summary Data. Brandon, Vermont: Safer Society Press
Calder, M. (2001) Juveniles and Children who Sexually Abuse: Frameworks for
Assessment (second edition). Lyme Regis: Russell House Publishing
Calder, M. (ed) (2002) Young People who Sexually Abuse. Building the Evidence Base
for your Practice. Lyme Regis: Russell House Publishing
Chaffin, M. and Bonner, B. (1998) ‘“Don’t Shoot, We’re Your Children.” Have We
Gone too Far in Our Response to Adolescent Sexual Abusers and Children with Sexual
Behavior Problems?’ Child Maltreatment, 3 (4) 314 –316
Department for Education and Skills (2003) Every Child Matters. London: HMSO
Department of Health (1999) Working to Safeguard Children. A Guide to Inter-Agency
Working to Safeguard and Promote the Welfare of Children. London: HMSO
Department of Health (2000) Framework for the Assessment of Children in Need and
their Families. London: HMSO
Department of Health and Children (1999) Children First: National Guidelines
for the Protection and Welfare of Children. Republic of Ireland: Department of Health
and Children
Department of Health, Social Services and Public Safety (1996) Co-operating to Protect
Children. Northern Ireland: Department of Health, Social Services and Public Safety
Department of Health, Social Services and Public Safety (2003) Co-operating to
Safeguard Children. Northern Ireland: Department of Health, Social Services and
Public SafetyErooga, M. and Masson, H. (eds) (1999) Children and Young People who Sexually
Abuse Others: Challenges and Responses. London: Routledge
Featherstone, B. and Lancaster, E. (1997) ‘Contemplating the Unthinkable: Men who
Sexually Abuse Children’ Critical Social Policy, 17 (4) 51–71.
Gil, E. and Cavanagh Johnson, T. (1992) Sexualized Children: Assessment and
Treatment of Sexualized Children and Children Who Molest. Rockville: Launch Press
Hackett, S. (1999) ‘Empowered Practice with Young People who Sexually Abuse’ in:
Masson, H. and Erooga, M. Children and Young People Who Sexually Abuse Others.
Challenges and Responses. London: Routledge
Hackett (2000) ‘Sexual Abuse, Diversity and the Challenge of Anti-Oppressive Practice’
Journal of Sexual Aggression, 5 (1) 4–20
Hackett, S. (2002) ‘Negotiating Difficult Terrain: The Personal Context to Work with
Young People who Sexually Abuse’ in: Calder, M. Young People who Sexually Abuse.
Building the Evidence Base for your Practice. Lyme Regis: Russell House Publishing
Home Office (1999) Home Office Guidance to the Probation Service. London:
Home Office
Home Office (2002) Criminal Statistics for England and Wales 2001. London:
Home Office
Home Office (2003) Youth Justice – the Next Steps. Companion Document to Every
Child Matters. London: Home Office
Jones, J. and Hunter, D. (1999) ‘Using the Delphi and Nominal Group Technique in
Health Services Research’ in: Pope, C. and Mays, N. Qualitative Research in Health
Care (second edition). London: BMJ
Lovell, L. (2002) I Think I Might Need Some More Help With This Problem.
London: NSPCC
Manocha, K. and Mezey, G.. (1998) ‘British Adolescents who Sexually Abuse: A
Descriptive Study’ Journal of Forensic Psychiatry, 9 (3) 588–508
Masson, H. (1995) ‘Children and Adolescents who Sexually Abuse other Children:
Responses to an Emerging Problem’. Journal of Social Welfare and Family Law,
17 (3) 325–326
Masson, H. (1997 and 1998) ‘Issues in relation to Young Sexual Abusers: A Survey of
Practitioners’ Views’. Journal of Sexual Aggression, 3 (2) 101–118
Munier, F. and Rondé, P. (2001) ‘The Role of Knowledge Codification in the
Emergence of Consensus under Uncertainty: Empirical Analysis and Policy
Implications’. Research Policy, 30, 1537–1551
NCH (1992) The Report of the Committee of Enquiry into Children and Young People
who Sexually Abuse Other Children. London: NCH
NOTA National Committee on Adolescents Who Sexually Harm (2003) Response to
Protecting the Public – Strengthening Protection against Sex Offenders and Reforming
the Law on Sexual Offences. Available at www.nota.co.ukO’Callaghan, D. and Print, B. (1994) ‘Adolescent Sexual Abusers: Research,
Assessment and Treatment’ in Morrison, T., Erooga, M. and Beckett, R. (eds)
Sexual Offending against Children: Assessment and Treatment of Male Abusers.
London: Routledge
O’Halloran, M., Carr, A., O’Reilly, G.., Sheerin, D., Cherry, J., Turner, R., Beckett, R.
and Brown, S. (2002) ‘Psychological Profiles of Sexually Abusive Adolescents in
Ireland’. Child Abuse and Neglect, 26, 349–370
Print, B., Morrison, T. and Henniker, J. (2001) ‘An Inter-agency Assessment Framework
for Young People who Sexually Abuse: Principles, Processes and Practicalities’ in:
Calder, M. Juveniles and Children who Sexually Abuse: Frameworks for Assessment
(second edition). Lyme Regis: Russell House Publishing
Rich, S. (1998) ‘A Developmental Approach to the Treatment of Adolescent Sexual
Offenders’. The Irish Journal of Psychology, 17 (1) 102–118
Reid, N. (1988) ‘The Delphi technique: Its Contribution to the Evaluation of
Professional Practice’ in Ellis, R. (ed) Professional Competence and Quality Assurance
in the Caring Professions. New York: Chapman and Hall
Ryan, G.. (1999) ‘Treatment of Sexually Abusive Youth – The Evolving Consensus’.
Journal of Interpersonal Violence, 14 (4) 422–436
Ryan, G. and Lane, S. (eds) (1991) Juvenile Sexual Offending. Causes, Consequences
and Correction. Lexington, Massachusetts/Toronto: Lexington Books
Ryan, G.. and Lane, S. (eds) (1997) Juvenile Sexual Offending. Causes, Consequences
and Corrections (second edition). San Francisco: Josey-Bass
Scottish Office (1998) Protecting Children: A Shared Responsibility. Scotland:
Scottish Office
Schneider, J. and Dutton, J. (2002) ‘Attitudes Towards Disabled Staff and the Effect of
the National Minimum Wage: A Delphi Survey of Employers and Disability
Employment Advisors’. Disability and Society, 3, 283–306
Stone Fish, L. and Osborn, J. (1992) ‘“Therapists’” Views of Family Life: A Delphi
Study’. Family Relations, 41, 409
Taylor, J. (2003) ‘Children and Young People Accused of Child Sexual Abuse: A Study
within the Community’. Journal of Sexual Aggression, 9 (1) 57–71
Thorpe, D., Smith, D., Green, C. and Paley, J. (1980) Out of Care: The Community
Support of Juvenile Offenders. London, George Allen and Unwin
Weinrott, M. (1996) Juvenile Sexual Aggression: A Critical Review. Institute of
Behavioural Science: University of Colorado
Will, D. (1994) ‘Impressions of the Tenth National Training Conference of the National
Adolescent Perpetrator Network, Denver, Colorado’. NOTA News, June, 50–53
Worling, J. and Curwen, T. (2000) ‘Adolescent Sexual Offender Recidivism: Success of
Specialized Treatment and Implications for Risk Prediction’. Child Abuse and Neglect,
24, 965–982
Youth Justice Board (2000) Asset. London: Youth Justice BoardYouth Justice Board (2002) Key Elements of Effective Practice – Young People who
Sexually Abuse. London: Youth Justice Board

Depositing User: Sara Taylor
Date Deposited: 21 Apr 2008 14:20
Last Modified: 18 Jul 2012 15:30
URI: http://eprints.hud.ac.uk/id/eprint/677

Downloads

Downloads per month over past year

Repository Staff Only: item control page

View Item View Item

University of Huddersfield, Queensgate, Huddersfield, HD1 3DH Copyright and Disclaimer All rights reserved ©