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Affective computing: problems, reactions and intentions

Ward, Robert D. and Marsden, Philip H. (2004) Affective computing: problems, reactions and intentions. Interacting With Computers, 16 (4). pp. 707-713. ISSN 0953-5438

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    Abstract

    Although we share the optimistic vision of affective computing presented in Interacting with Computers 14(2), we question the extent to which affective sensing can support the kinds of applications proposed in the literature. These applications depend upon the detection of affective reactions to HCI situations and events, but it has yet to be shown that such reactions can reliably be detected in subtle and natural situations. We also point out that, in human–human interaction, intentional commmunicative affect is both easier to recognise and more important than reactive affect. We suggest exploration of this idea may lead to more fruitful applications of affective computing.

    Item Type: Article
    Additional Information: UoA 23 (Computer Science and Informatics) Copyright © 2004 Elsevier B.V.
    Subjects: Q Science > QA Mathematics > QA75 Electronic computers. Computer science
    Schools: School of Computing and Engineering
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    Depositing User: Sara Taylor
    Date Deposited: 07 Jan 2008
    Last Modified: 13 Oct 2010 13:39
    URI: http://eprints.hud.ac.uk/id/eprint/274

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