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Thyrotropin-releasing hormone (TRH) promotes wound re-epithelialisation in frog and human skin

Meier, Natalia T., Haslam, Iain S., Pattwell, David M., Zhang, Guo-You, Emelianov, Vladimir, Paredes, Roberto, Debus, Sebastian, Augustin, Matthias, Funk, Wolfgang, Amaya, Enrique, Kloepper, Jennifer E., Hardman, Matthew J. and Paus, Ralf (2013) Thyrotropin-releasing hormone (TRH) promotes wound re-epithelialisation in frog and human skin. PLoS ONE, 8 (9). e73596. ISSN 1932-6203

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Abstract

There remains a critical need for new therapeutics that promote wound healing in patients suffering from chronic skin wounds. This is, in part, due to a shortage of simple, physiologically and clinically relevant test systems for investigating candidate agents. The skin of amphibians possesses a remarkable regenerative capacity, which remains insufficiently explored for clinical purposes. Combining comparative biology with a translational medicine approach, we report the development and application of a simple ex vivo frog (Xenopus tropicalis) skin organ culture system that permits exploration of the effects of amphibian skin-derived agents on re-epithelialisation in both frog and human skin. Using this amphibian model, we identify thyrotropin-releasing hormone (TRH) as a novel stimulant of epidermal regeneration. Moving to a complementary human ex vivo wounded skin assay, we demonstrate that the effects of TRH are conserved across the amphibian-mammalian divide: TRH stimulates wound closure and formation of neo-epidermis in organ-cultured human skin, accompanied by increased keratinocyte proliferation and wound healing-associated differentiation (cytokeratin 6 expression). Thus, TRH represents a novel, clinically relevant neuroendocrine wound repair promoter that deserves further exploration. These complementary frog and human skin ex vivo assays encourage a comparative biology approach in future wound healing research so as to facilitate the rapid identification and preclinical testing of novel, evolutionarily conserved, and clinically relevant wound healing promoters.

Item Type: Article
Subjects: Q Science > QH Natural history > QH301 Biology
R Medicine > RL Dermatology
Schools: School of Applied Sciences
School of Applied Sciences > Biomolecular Sciences Research Centre
Depositing User: Iain Haslam
Date Deposited: 11 Nov 2015 11:22
Last Modified: 11 Nov 2015 13:17
URI: http://eprints.hud.ac.uk/id/eprint/26421

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