Search:
Computing and Library Services - delivering an inspiring information environment

Editorial: crime patterns in time and space: the dynamics of crime opportunities in urban areas

Newton, Andrew D. and Felson, Marcus (2015) Editorial: crime patterns in time and space: the dynamics of crime opportunities in urban areas. Crime Science, 4. p. 11. ISSN 2193-7680

[img]
Preview
PDF - Published Version
Available under License Creative Commons Attribution.

Download (392kB) | Preview

Abstract

The routine activity approach and associated crime pattern theory emphasise how crime emerges from spatio-temporal routines. In order to understand this crime should be studied in both space and time. However, the bulk of research into crime patterns and related activities has investigated the spatial distributions of crime, neglecting the temporal dimension. Specifically, disaggregation of crime by place and by time, for example hour of day, day of week, month of year, season, or school day versus none school day, is extremely relevant to theory. Modern data make such spatio-temporal disaggregation increasingly feasible, as exemplified in this special issue. First, much larger data files allow disaggregation of crime data into temporal and spatial slices. Second, new forms of data are generated by modern technologies, allowing innovative and new forms of analyses. Crime pattern analyses and routine activity inquiries are now able to explore avenues not previously available. The unique collection of nine papers in this thematic issue specifically examine spatio-temporal patterns of crime to; demonstrate the value of this approach for advancing knowledge in the field; consider how this informs our theoretical understanding of the manifestations of crime in time and space; to consider the prevention implications of this; and to raise awareness of the need for further spatio-temporal research into crime events

Item Type: Article
Subjects: H Social Sciences > H Social Sciences (General)
H Social Sciences > HN Social history and conditions. Social problems. Social reform
Schools: School of Human and Health Sciences
Related URLs:
Depositing User: Sara Taylor
Date Deposited: 18 Aug 2015 15:00
Last Modified: 30 Nov 2016 17:57
URI: http://eprints.hud.ac.uk/id/eprint/25467

Downloads

Downloads per month over past year

Repository Staff Only: item control page

View Item View Item

University of Huddersfield, Queensgate, Huddersfield, HD1 3DH Copyright and Disclaimer All rights reserved ©