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Investigating the relationship between meta-cognitive beliefs, thought fusion beliefs and worry, in relation to obsessive-compulsive behaviours and symptoms within the general population

Bose, Priyanka (2014) Investigating the relationship between meta-cognitive beliefs, thought fusion beliefs and worry, in relation to obsessive-compulsive behaviours and symptoms within the general population. Masters thesis, University of Huddersfield.

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Abstract

Previous research and theory has suggested that in clinical samples, meta-cognitive beliefs and thought fusion beliefs (also referred to as magical thinking) as well as worry, contribute to the development of OCD behaviours and symptoms. However, worry, meta-cognitive and thought fusion beliefs are a cognitive phenomena, which are also found in the general population. The aim of the present study was to examine relationships between these variables and OCD in a non-clinical sample, since both worry and thought fusion beliefs have been under-researched in the literature.
A total of 301 participants, (144 males and 157 females, age range: 18-72 years, Mage = 32.6 years, SD=14.7), who had not been diagnosed with OCD, completed the Generalised anxiety disorder scale (GADS) which measures levels of worry, the meta-cognitions questionnaire (MCQ-30) which measures meta-cognitive factors which are suggested to relate to OCD behaviours and symptoms, the Thought Fusion Inventory (TFI), which assesses the beliefs held by individuals regarding the power of their thoughts and experiences, and the Obsessive-Compulsive Inventory (OCI) which measures OCD behaviours and symptoms.
As predicted, a multiple regression analysis showed that meta-cognitive beliefs and thought fusion beliefs predicted OCD behaviours and symptoms after controlling for worry. However, contrary to predictions, a moderated regression analysis revealed that worry did not moderate the relationship between meta-cognitive beliefs and OCD behaviours and symptoms. As predicted, an analysis demonstrated that worry significantly predicted meta-cognitive beliefs. Additionally, as predicted, a hierarchical multiple regression analysis demonstrated that worry significantly predicted OCD behaviour and symptoms whilst controlling for meta-cognitive beliefs. Finally, thought fusion beliefs predicted OCD behaviours and symptoms whilst controlling for worry. These results are discussed in relation to previous research and theory and suggestions for future directions are made.

Item Type: Thesis (Masters)
Subjects: H Social Sciences > H Social Sciences (General)
Q Science > Q Science (General)
Depositing User: Elizabeth Boulton
Date Deposited: 10 Mar 2015 15:20
Last Modified: 02 Dec 2016 05:42
URI: http://eprints.hud.ac.uk/id/eprint/23735

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