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A randomized controlled trial of guided self-help for improving the experience of caring for carers of clients with depression

McCann, Terence V., Songprakun, Wallapa and Stephenson, John (2015) A randomized controlled trial of guided self-help for improving the experience of caring for carers of clients with depression. Journal of Advanced Nursing, 71 (7). pp. 1600-1610. ISSN 0309-2402

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Abstract

Aim
To evaluate the effectiveness of a cognitive behaviour therapy guided self-help manual for enhancing the experience of caregiving of family carers of individuals with depression.

Background
The prevalence of depression is increasing markedly in Thailand. While primary carers give most of the support for individuals with depression, they receive little support from mental health services in this critical role.

Design
A randomized controlled trial.

Method
Carers were randomized to guided self-help (n = 27), while the control group received standard information and support (n = 27). Both groups also received a short weekly telephone call. Participants were assessed at three time points; the outcome measure was the Experience of Caregiving Inventory. A doubly multivariate analysis of variance (anova) procedure, including between-group and within-group factors, was implemented. Fieldwork was from October 2007–May 2008.

Results
Fifty-four carers completed the study and intent-to-treat analyses were undertaken. The findings showed there was a significant reduction in the total negative experience of caring, from baseline to post-treatment, in the intervention group recipients of the manual compared with the control group and treatment effects were maintained at one-month follow-up. Similarly, a significant improvement in the total positive experience of caring occurred, from baseline to post-treatment, in the intervention group in contrast with the control group and these outcomes were sustained at one-month follow-up.

Conclusion
Guided self-help strengthen carers’ positive and reduces their negative, experience of caring. The study contributes to the limited evidence base about this approach in a developing country such as Thailand.

Item Type: Article
Subjects: R Medicine > R Medicine (General)
R Medicine > RT Nursing
Schools: School of Human and Health Sciences
Related URLs:
Depositing User: Sara Taylor
Date Deposited: 19 Feb 2015 14:34
Last Modified: 25 Nov 2015 13:07
URI: http://eprints.hud.ac.uk/id/eprint/23463

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