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‘King Solomon’s mines cannot compare with the money that has been raked in by greyhound racing’: Greyhound racing, its critics and the working class, c. 1926 to 1951.

Laybourn, Keith (2014) ‘King Solomon’s mines cannot compare with the money that has been raked in by greyhound racing’: Greyhound racing, its critics and the working class, c. 1926 to 1951. Labor History, 55 (5). pp. 607-621. ISSN 0023-656X

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Abstract

Greyhound racing emerged in Britain in 1926 and, during its first quarter of a century, was subject to institutional middle-class opposition because of the legal gambling opportunities it offered to the working class. Much maligned as a dissipate and impoverishing activity it was in fact a significant leisure opportunity for the working class, which cost little for the minority of bettors involved in what was clearly no more than a ‘bit of a flutter’.

Item Type: Article
Subjects: H Social Sciences > H Social Sciences (General)
H Social Sciences > HT Communities. Classes. Races
H Social Sciences > HV Social pathology. Social and public welfare
Schools: School of Music, Humanities and Media
Related URLs:
Depositing User: Sara Taylor
Date Deposited: 09 Sep 2014 11:16
Last Modified: 04 Nov 2015 19:34
URI: http://eprints.hud.ac.uk/id/eprint/21516

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