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High-resolution mtDNA evidence for the late-glacial resettlement of Europe from an Iberian refugium

Pereira, Luísa, Richards, Martin B., Goios, Ana, Alonso, Antonio, Albarrán, Cristina, Garcia, Oscar, Behar, Doron M., Gölge, Mukaddes, Hatina, Jiři, Al-Gazali, Lihadh, Bradley, Daniel G., Macaulay, Vincent and Amorim, António (2005) High-resolution mtDNA evidence for the late-glacial resettlement of Europe from an Iberian refugium. Genome Research, 15 (1). pp. 19-24. ISSN 1088-9051

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The advent of complete mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) sequence data has ushered in a new phase of human evolutionary studies. Even quite limited volumes of complete mtDNA sequence data can now be used to identify the critical polymorphisms that define sub-clades within an mtDNA haplogroup, providing a springboard for large-scale high-resolution screening of human mtDNAs. This strategy has in the past been applied to mtDNA haplogroup V, which represents <5% of European mtDNAs. Here we adopted a similar approach to haplogroup H, by far the most common European haplogroup, which at lower resolution displayed a rather uninformative frequency distribution within Europe. Using polymorphism information derived from the growing complete mtDNA sequence database, we sequenced 1580 base pairs of targeted coding-region segments of the mtDNA genome in 649 individuals harboring mtDNA haplogroup H from populations throughout Europe, the Caucasus, and the Near East. The enhanced genealogical resolution clearly shows that sub-clades of haplogroup H have highly distinctive geographical distributions. The patterns of frequency and diversity suggest that haplogroup H entered Europe from the Near East ∼20,000–25,000 years ago, around the time of the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM), and some sub-clades re-expanded from an Iberian refugium when the glaciers retreated ∼15,000 years ago. This shows that a large fraction of the maternal ancestry of modern Europeans traces back to the expansion of hunter-gatherer populations at the end of the last Ice Ag

Item Type: Article
Subjects: D History General and Old World > D History (General) > D901 Europe (General)
Q Science > Q Science (General)
Q Science > QH Natural history > QH426 Genetics
Schools: School of Applied Sciences
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Depositing User: Sara Taylor
Date Deposited: 12 Aug 2014 15:38
Last Modified: 04 Nov 2015 19:20


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