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Antimicrobial activity of a chlorhexidine intravascular catheter site gel dressing

Karpanen, T. J., Casey, A. L., Conway, Barbara R, Lambert, P. A. and Elliott, T. S. J. (2011) Antimicrobial activity of a chlorhexidine intravascular catheter site gel dressing. Journal of Antimicrobial Chemotherapy, 66 (8). pp. 1777-1784. ISSN 0305-7453

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Abstract

Objectives The antimicrobial efficacy of a chlorhexidine gluconate (CHG) intravascular catheter gel dressing was evaluated against methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) and an extended-spectrum β-lactamase (ESBL)-producing Escherichia coli. Chlorhexidine deposition on the skin surface and release from the gel were determined.
Methods The antimicrobial efficacy was evaluated in in vitro studies following microbial inoculation of the dressing and application of the dressing on the inoculated surface of a silicone membrane and donor skin [with and without a catheter segment and/or 10% (v/v) serum] on diffusion cells. Antimicrobial activity was evaluated for up to 7 days. Chlorhexidine skin surface deposition and release were also determined.
Results MRSA and E. coli were not detectable within 5 min following direct inoculation onto the CHG gel dressing. On the silicone membrane, 3 log and 6 log inocula of MRSA were eradicated within 5 min and 1 h, respectively. Time to kill was prolonged in the presence of serum and a catheter segment. Following inoculation of donor skin with 6 log cfu of MRSA, none was detected after 24 h. Chlorhexidine was released from the gel after a lag time of 30 min and increasing amounts were detected on the donor skin surface over the 48 h test period. The CHG gel dressing retained its antimicrobial activity on the artificial skin for 7 days.
Conclusions The CHG intravascular catheter site gel dressing had detectable antimicrobial activity for up to 7 days, which should suppress bacterial growth on the skin at the catheter insertion site, thereby reducing the risk of infection.

Item Type: Article
Subjects: Q Science > Q Science (General)
Q Science > QD Chemistry
Schools: School of Applied Sciences
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Depositing User: Sara Taylor
Date Deposited: 20 Sep 2011 12:17
Last Modified: 18 Oct 2011 15:36
URI: http://eprints.hud.ac.uk/id/eprint/11514

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